Jul 29, 2013

Watch: A Huge Kinetic Sculpture Balanced Miraculously On A Single Feather

bartlett somer show 2013

richard rogers was a bad student at the AA. Evidence!

"As architects we have a responsibility to society" - Richard Rogers
Rogers' report card from the Architectural Association School of Architecture
"Rogers' late entry into the 4th Year was not successful," reads the report. "He has a genuine interest in and a feeling for architecture, but sorely lacks the intellectual equipment to translate these feelings into sound building."
The report continues: "His designs will continue to suffer while his drawing is so bad, his method of work so chaotic and his critical judgement so inarticulate."
"I was an appalling student, all my life," admits Rogers, who was later diagnosed as suffering from dyslexia. "In fact, I enjoyed myself much more in the last third of my life than I did in my first third."
"Everybody said I was stupid and then I found out that actually I had learning difficulties. So those gave me a lot of problems for the first thirty years. But the last 30 years of my life have been fantastic."

Frank Gehry reveals latest design for trio of towers in Toronto


Frank Gehry in Toronto
News: architect Frank Gehry has updated his design for a cluster of three towers in his home city of Toronto.
Planned for King Street West at the centre of Toronto's entertainment district, the proposed gallery and university complex includes the construction of three 82-86 storey metre skyscrapers, atop an expansive art gallery and a learning centre for OCAD University's art history and curatorial courses.
Frank Gehry in Toronto
Moving on from the initial design revealed in October 2012Frank Gehryenvisages the three residential towers with layers of ribbon-like cladding, creating curving surfaces and asymmetrical shapes. Despite objections from the city's planning department, the proposed heights remain unchanged.
The planned demolition of three warehouses and a small theatre to make way for the new buildings also prompted concerns from city officials. In response, Gehry has added a structure of vertical, horizontal and diagonal wooden beams to the base buildings as a reference to the area's industrial past.
Frank Gehry in Toronto
"Toronto has grown to look like every other screwed-up city," Gehry told the Toronto Star. "We're searching for that way of expressing old Toronto without copying what they did."
He continued: "It's not hard to do a skyscraper; but how do you do one that has some Toronto DNA in it? I lived not far from the site. I remember the warehouses. It was the industrial section where the factories were. But we need to bring a new kind of life down there."
Frank Gehry in Toronto
The project is currently set for completion in 2023.

Jul 24, 2013

The Fathers of Digital Architecture Are Reunited In a New Exhibition


Frank O. Gehry & Associates, Inc. Lewis Residence, Lyndhurst, Ohio: Elevation rendering from Catia 3D model,1989-1995. Image provided by Gehry Partners, LLP.
There’s something novel about the Canadian Center for Architecture's latest exhibition, “Archaeology of the Digital,” on view in Montreal through October. Rather than focus solely on the use of digital media in architecture, the show, curated by American architect Greg Lynn in collaboration with the CCA, calls for the development of a history of digital art and design, and an archive of the technology employed in its creation.
Among the challenges that present themselves when cataloguing and preserving digital art is the rate at which technologies and media are rendered redundant and are obsolete, a challenge that makes preserving the tools used to create digital art forms as important as preserving the art itself.
Another challenge to establishing a history of digital art is rethinking the relationship between digital art and our own time. Greg Lynn, one of the first architects to use vector animation technology, explains that “in architecture, the expression ‘in the future’ has too often been held synonymous with the term ‘digital,’” and vice-versa. But what happens after we've been living in a digital age for the past 20 years? In other words, it’s worth considering that digital technology has been around long enough in the world of architecture to benefit from analysis and documentation. 
Through its focus on architecture, “Archaeology of the Digital” documents one facet of digital art history and pays tribute to the use of digital tools in building development--from conceptualizing a design to making it a reality. As they explore the most avant-garde projects from the 80s and 90s, viewers discover the evolution of architectural experimentation, from the development of new software to the adoption of new techniques, all in the aim of finding out how digital technology negotiated the architectural obstacles and challenges present in a given time period. 
Peter Eisenman, Eisenman/Robertson Architects. Biozentrum, Biology Center for the J.W. Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main, Germany: Study Perspective,1987. Peter Eisenman fonds, Canadian Centre for Architecture.
To get an idea what kind of challenges digital technology has helped architects overcome, viewers can examine theBiozentrum (1987) project by Peter Eisenman and his team. This JW Goethe University building in Frankfurt incorporates geometric shapes inspired by the structural complexity of the ADN. The project’s blueprints were tailor-designed and perfected thanks to CRAY, a supercomputer comprising modeling software like Archimodos andFormeZ.
Frank Gehry worked on the Lewis Residence, a laboratory for experimenting with new 3D modeling technologies, from 1989 to 1995. Acting as a bridge between concept sketches and digital simulations, the technical drafts produced by the project allowed for new technology, materials, and techniques to emerge. The project also led to the development of a new, complex language of design developed mostly thanks to the Computer Aided three-dimensional interactive Application program known as CATIA.
Frank O. Gehry & Associates, Inc. Lewis Residence, Lyndhurst, Ohio: Fish, Geometrical frame of the conservatory from Catia 3D model, 1989-1995. Image provided by Gehry Partners, LLP.
Frank O. Gehry & Associates, Inc. Lewis Residence, Lyndhurst, Ohio: Elevation rendering from Catia 3D model,1989-1995. Image provided by Gehry Partners, LLP.
A side-by-side analysis of architectural projects from the period shows that a wide array of tools already existed for the production of digital art in the 80s and 90s. Although digital technology was commonly used at some point in the development of architectural projects in this period, it didn’t always appear at the same stage of development.
That was the case for Chuck Hoberman (1988-1992), the creator of the expanding sphere, a polyhedron that can expand and contract, and the Iris Dome, a ceiling that opens and closes like an eyelid, which only employed digital technology in the final stages of his production. Through his work on geometry, movement, and robotics, Hoberman created an origami-like architecture with the capacity to react and adapt. Before making his projects a physical reality, Hoberman turned to technical tests to simulate the mechanisms in his structures, developing his ownAutoLISP scripts.
Chuck Hoberman, Hoberman Associates. Expanding geodesic dome, 1991. Hoberman fonds, Canadian Centre for Architecture © Hoberman Associates.
Chuck Hoberman, Hoberman Associates. Views of an Iris Dome model, 1993. Chuck Hoberman fonds, Canadian Centre for Architecture © Hoberman Associates.
Finally, Shoei Yoh’s interest in phenomenology led him to develop designs for roofs that would react to fluctuations in outdoor conditions, a project lasting from 1990 to 1992. The infrastructures of the Galaxy Toyama gymnasium roof and of the Odawara sporting complex roof, which was never constructed, were designed to respond and adapt to the weight of snow, to the pressure of wind, and to light, creating hybrid buildings in-tune with nature.
By inputting the diverse possibilities of his structures to manifest new shapes and forms into tools permitting digital analysis, Yoh obtained codes which, once translated and tested digitally, produced a new, minimalist structural language.
Shoei Yoh + Architects. Odawara Municipal Sports Complex, Odawara, Kanagawa, Japan: Computer-generated images of deformation of roof, 1990-1991. © Shoei Yoh + Architects.
Besides its mandate to educate the public at large, the Canadian Center for Architecture’s “Archaeology of the Digital” exhibit is the first page in an expansive history of digital design that lies ready to be discovered by a new generation of emerging theoreticians and historians of the digital age. It is also a part of the Canadian Center for Architecture’s long-term project to create an archive that will facilitate the research and critical consideration of the development and use of digital tools in architecture.

numen architecture

Installation Pablo Gil and Jaime Bartolome GilBartolome ADW

24.000 staples
 Pablo Gil and Jaime Bartolomé Architects,  GilBartolome ADW

The most important issue was to show well the work of the students. Following the tradition of merging architecture, sculpture and painting we have tried to liven up the drawings and models by using sculptural movements and compositional plays of the architecture that prepare the positioning and the experience of these objects. On the left there are mostly drawings and on the right, which resembles a table, there are models.

Instalación que recoge los trabajos de alumnos de arquitectura de la UEM

There is a very important role of artisanship in this piece. The design process is based on the use of digital tools -but with a twist. The digital design process tried to control and predict the use of manual work, but also left areas that seemed impossible to fabricate -as in the area above the table, on the right. It was a challenge to artisanship -and in the end, once it actually was made possible, it has become a challenge to digital design and fabrication. The hand won the battle.

We would define this way of working as  “dirty digital fabrication” through the use of the ability of infinite differentiation by the hand. In contrast to computational coding, craftsmanship can be subject to contradictions, sudden shifts, creative maneuvers, breakthroughs through the use of tools -needed in the making process and impossible to predict aprioristically-,  artful failures and “creative approximations to the idea”, an intent that when is practiced sequentially, achieves a noticeable handmade quality not yet seen by machines.

Instalación que recoge los trabajos de alumnos de arquitectura de la UEM
In this context it is important to recognize the role of the craftsmen “Chencho” Inocencio Galán and Franklin Manobanda. Both have played a major role in the execution of the piece. They have also interfered with the design marvelously. Besides, there has been a team of incredible students and monitors of UEM that took the challenge of making this exhibition possible with amazing passion and drive. The atmosphere we lived during the month of making was joyful, memorable and vibrant. One has to ask if that was not in itself a higher achievement than the piece itself, and if the lessons of John Ruskin are not to be put again in the forefront of the social agenda and of the architecture that gets built.

You will see a series of pieces integrated within the installation. There is, in the left hand side, a prototype of luminescent façade by Rosa Pilar Jimenez, a prototype made of iron rod that serves spiders as a vibrating  instrument to catch prey by David Moreno, the electronics by Rafael Otero. There is also a prototype of robotized façade of silicone that, based on the system of fins of a fish, allows the entrance of light and fresh air when needed. It has been developed by myself with Claudio Rossi and William Coral from the robotics department of CSIC. Finally there is a double skin silicone colour changing façade prototype by Juan Carlos Rodríguez. The intention was to merge these different units in the general geometry of the piece, a tectonic that is hereditary of my drawings in which the pencil homogenizes materiality differences.

Finally we have paid homage to Antonio Palacios, the Gaudi of Madrid, who struggled to keep afloat within his contradictory drive towards artisanship and industrialization, a struggle for which we feel a lot of sympathy. For this homage, the students Juan Rodríguez, Miguel Labrandero, Pablo Gancedo, Francisco Garrido, Pablo Durán and ourselves have used a sculpture of Angel García Díaz, Palacio´s collaborator, depicting the symbol of communication as Mercury , the roman god of messages- a very castizo metaphor to be placed in the Central Post Office building of Spain that is now placed at the edge of the installation, conferring it  a numinous quality and a theriomorphic structure that helloes and warns the visitor of what is to be found behind.
gilbartolome expo UEM 3
gilbartolome expo UEM 4

rehabilitation roof Malaga cathedral


estado previo



rehabilitación
El criterio de intervención desarrolla la idea constructiva ganadora del concurso para la restauración de las Cubiertas de la Catedral de Málaga promovido por la Consejería de Cultura:

- Eliminar la penetración de agua en las fábricas de muros, bóvedas y rellenos de las mismas
- Dotar a la cubierta interior de aislamiento térmico y facilitar la transpiración y ventilación para evitar condensación.
- Facilitar las dilataciones y contracciones térmicas de la nueva hoja exterior de cubierta.
- Proyectar un sistema de cubierta que no se deteriore por los movimientos de las grietas.
- Canalizar adecuadamente las aguas.
- Mejorar la impermeabilidad de canalones, paramentos verticales de la cubierta, coronación de muros, etc.
- Completar la red de bajantes y evitar la caída libre de las aguas
- Utilizar materiales compatibles con los existentes, no degradables ni alterables por excrementos o ataques de aves y permita la fácil limpieza y mantenimiento.
- Alteración mínima de la imagen histórica del edificio.

Soluciones Constructivas propuestas:

En las cubiertas altas se propone un sistema de cubierta sobre la antigua, a la catalana de la siguiente manera:
1º. Construcción de citaras de apoyo, dispuestas radialmente sobre las bóvedas y de arriostramiento a menos de entre ejes.
2º. Colocación de aislamiento térmico.
3º. Sobre las maestras y tiras de papel Kraft se apoya una hoja de rasillón de ladrillo.
4ª. Capa de compresión de hormigón con malla de acero inoxidable.
5º. Impermeabilización de esta cubierta con lámina autoadhesiva de plomo 0.7mm sobre capa inferior de betún
6º. Capa de emulsión asfáltica
7º. Capa de mortero a modo de alcatifa
8º. Solería de acabado con baldosín cerámico dispuesta en forma circular
9º. Canalones construidos con el mismo sándwich
10º. Previsión de junta de dilatación y zabaletas de chapa de acero cortén.
11º. El hueco central de ventilación se formará mediante chimenea de fábrica del mismo ladrillo macizo perforado de las citaras del empalomado. Se cubrirá con pieza confeccionada ad hoc de cerámica vidriada de 2.5cm de espesor, a modo de cazoleta invertida.







Jul 22, 2013

An Illustrated History of Unbelievably Camouflaged Ships


It's difficult to hide from an enemy when you're inside an enormous ship, or part of a vast Naval fleet. And yet many ships in history have been well-camouflaged, despite a distinct lack of cloaking devices. Here are some of the most amazing examples.

USS West Mahomet (a steel-hulled cargo ship of the U.S. Navy, 1918-1919, but used as a merchant vessel under the name SS West Mahomet between 1919 and 1930. Scrapped in 1938.)

An Illustrated History of Unbelievably Camouflaged ShipsSEXPAND

The beginnings

An Illustrated History of Unbelievably Camouflaged ShipsSEXPAND
Between the 16th and the late-19th centuries some ships might had cannon ports hidden by painted canvas, or extra cannon ports painted. In the Civil War and later the German and French ships were being painted gray.
(Pictured: CSS Atlanta, 1862, via U.S. Naval Historic Center)

The USS Narkeeta (a Wahneta Class District Harbor Tug, launched in 1892 and decommissioned in 1923.)

An Illustrated History of Unbelievably Camouflaged ShipsSEXPAND

It had an experimental "brickwork" camouflage scheme in 1892.
(via Navsource)

HMS Adventure (a scout cruiser of Royal Navy, 1904-1919, scrapped in 1920)

An Illustrated History of Unbelievably Camouflaged ShipsSEXPAND

USS Nebraska (Virginia-class pre-dreadnought battleship of the U.S. Navy, launched in 1904, scrapped in 1920)

An Illustrated History of Unbelievably Camouflaged ShipsSEXPAND
An Illustrated History of Unbelievably Camouflaged ShipsSEXPAND

RMS Mauretania (originally an ocean liner, launched in 1906, but during WWI it transported troops and used as a hospital ship. Retired in 1934, scrapped in 1935.)

An Illustrated History of Unbelievably Camouflaged Ships
An Illustrated History of Unbelievably Camouflaged ShipsSEXPAND
An Illustrated History of Unbelievably Camouflaged Ships

The transatlantic Olympic-class ocean liner RMS Olympic, the brother of the Titanic and Britannic (launched in 1910, used as a troopship between 1915 and 1919. Retired in 1935.)

An Illustrated History of Unbelievably Camouflaged ShipsSEXPAND
In 1917 the British Navy added a multi-coloured camouflage to make the ship more difficult to identify and target.
An Illustrated History of Unbelievably Camouflaged ShipsSEXPAND
The RMS Olympic was known as "Old Reliable", it would carry over 200,000 troops to and from the fighting fronts during WWI.

SS Empress Of Russia (built as an ocean liner in 1912-1913, refitted as an Armed Merchant Cruiser of the British Army during the WWI, but after the World War it was used as an ocean liner again. Scrapped in 1945.)

An Illustrated History of Unbelievably Camouflaged ShipsSEXPAND

USS Leviathan (originally built in 1913 as an ocean liner named Vaterland. In 1917, it was renamed Leviathan, and used as a troopship. After World War I it was used by the American shipping company United States Lines until 1934. It was sold for scrapping in 1938.)

An Illustrated History of Unbelievably Camouflaged ShipsSEXPAND
An Illustrated History of Unbelievably Camouflaged ShipsSEXPAND

USS K-5 (a K-class submarine of the U.S. Navy, launched in 1914, sold for scrap in 1931.)

An Illustrated History of Unbelievably Camouflaged ShipsSEXPAND

It had a zebra camouflage in 1916 for a short time.
(via Navsource)

HMS Polyanthus (an Aubretia class sloop of the Royal Navy, launched in 1917 and sold in 1921 to a shipping company)

An Illustrated History of Unbelievably Camouflaged ShipsSEXPAND

HMS Rocksand (a minesweeping sloop of the Royal Navy, used between 1918 and 1922.)

An Illustrated History of Unbelievably Camouflaged ShipsSEXPAND

HMS Argus (an aircraft carrier of the Royal Navy between 1918 and 1944. After the WWII it became an accommodation ship and sold in late 1946 for scrap.)

An Illustrated History of Unbelievably Camouflaged Ships
An Illustrated History of Unbelievably Camouflaged ShipsSEXPAND

USS Alloway (a cargo ship of U.S. Navy, 1918-1919)

An Illustrated History of Unbelievably Camouflaged ShipsSEXPAND

HMS Adventure (a minelaying cruiser of the Royal Navy, launched in 1924, sold for scrapping in 1947)

An Illustrated History of Unbelievably Camouflaged Ships
It was the first ship built for service as a minelayer and the first warship to use diesel engines.

USS Northampton (a heavy cruiser of the U.S. Navy, commissioned in 1930, sunk in November 1942)

An Illustrated History of Unbelievably Camouflaged ShipsSEXPAND
It had a false bow wave camouflage.
(via U.S. Navy)

Gloire (means Glory, a light cruiser of the French Navy, launched in 1935, scrapped in 1958)

An Illustrated History of Unbelievably Camouflaged ShipsSEXPAND
An Illustrated History of Unbelievably Camouflaged ShipsSEXPAND

HMAS Yarra (a Grimsby class sloop of the Royal Australian Navy, launched in 1935 and sunk by Japanese cruisers in 1942)

An Illustrated History of Unbelievably Camouflaged ShipsSEXPAND

Tirpitz (a Bismarck-class battleship of the German War Navy Kriegsmarine, commissioned in 1941, sunk by Royal Air Force bombers in November 1944)

An Illustrated History of Unbelievably Camouflaged ShipsSEXPAND

USS Hancock (an Essex-class aircraft carrier of the U.S. Navy, used between 1944-1947, but modernized and recommissioned in 1954. Sold for scrap in 1976)

An Illustrated History of Unbelievably Camouflaged ShipsSEXPAND

Bonus: HSwMS Helsingborg (a Visby-class corvette of the Swedish Navy, launched in 2003, in service from 2009)

An Illustrated History of Unbelievably Camouflaged Ships